ABC Australia tries again to discredit recovered memories of child abuse

ABC Australia has in the past published news that discredit memories of child abuse recovered in adulthood.

The article ties to a study done on the susceptibility of young adults to being tricked into accepting imagined experiences as real ones. According to their own description of the study, the participants were interviewed in a way that was likely to cause them to embellish their actual memories, to see if they could be made to believe their own embellishments – Some could.

The journalist writes: “The study from the University of Warwick in the UK surveyed 423 people, and found that 30 per cent could recall things that
had never actually happened to them.”

Well, so can I. I can recall dreams and know they are dreams. I can recall imagining doing things and know that I haven’t done them.

For most adults it is quite easy to distinguish between memories of real events and memories of imagined things. However, young adults are less experienced at distinguishing these and many other things in life – perfect subjects for a study on the reliability of memory.

According to the journalist, the quoted study doesnt address the validity of recovered memories of childhood traumatic experiences at all, but is being heavily pushed as a way to claim that recovered memories are likely false and newly imagined in adulthood.

The article doesn’t even once ask if there is any evidence that recovered memories have a basis in truth. It is a very biased, one sided article with a clear agenda. It only addresses the unreliability of memory.

Well, if memory is so unreliable, how do we manage to get along as we do? We are able to trust and rely on our memories, we couldn’t live as we do without a reliable memory.

Despite trying to discredit recovered memories, the article doesnt mention at all the nature of typically recovered memories, which are not single isolated events in a normal childhood, but a collection of pieces of recollections that support a coherent scenario, and often are associated with people who suffer psychological disturbances that are known to be associated with child abuse.

The ABC enlists the assistance of an Australian memory researcher, Dr. Ecker, who uses the study to push his own agenda about recovered memories being false – which matches the agenda of the ABC.

The purpose of this article is to discredit the survivors of child abuse who claim to have recovered memories of that abuse in adulthood. It serves to assist pedophiles getting away with shocking crimes. I specifically isolate this agenda over more general ones, because of past ABC Australia articles regarding the reliability of memory. They really love to discredit people who claim to have recalled child sexual abuse.

The article also makes a puzzling link with fake news, the current fad in discrediting others, when fake news is about people naively believing what they hear in any media as true – such as Iraq’s WMDs that never existed, but was widely claimed to be true by the ABC and most mainstream media. Such news isn’t related to so-called false memories or this study at all, why make the association? – Unless this ABC article is fake news.

ABC Australia is expected to have a high standard of journalism where one-sided biased articles are unacceptable. But it just parrots the one-sided propaganda we see in most of the establishment-controlled mainstream media.

The only way to see how biased they are is to seek out alternative media and compare their articles about a particular topic or event. Its a mind-opening experience that will destroy any tendency to believe any claim insufficiently supports by evidence.

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Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-16/one-third-can-remember-events-that-never-happened-study/8127954

(ABC has in the past deleted articles about false memory that cause controversy for them)

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ABC Australia tries again to discredit recovered memories of child abuse

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